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Archive for the ‘spiritual growth’ Category

Jesus taught that how we live on earth has bearing on what we will have in heaven.

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys, and where thieves do not break in or steal; for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”
(Mat 6:19-21 NASB)

Now, this is a bit controversial, and I thought like a lot of people until I read works by Randy Alcorn and began looking at the Scriptures more closely. Many have the view that when we all get to heaven, we will all be the same. We will all have the same reward and the same level of knowledge. While we are all saved by grace, their are different levels of reward in heaven based upon the way we live our lives here. We will not be condemned for our bad works, but our works will be judged. Paul wrote the following to the Corinthians.

Now if any man builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw, each man’s work will become evident; for the day will show it because it is to be revealed with fire, and the fire itself will test the quality of each man’s work. If any man’s work which he has built on it remains, he will receive a reward. If any man’s work is burned up, he will suffer loss; but he himself will be saved, yet so as through fire.
(1Co 3:12-15 NASB)

So, we see that there will be a difference.  How we live and minister now will have eternal consequences.  Therefore, we should approach decisions and life asking if what we are doing or may do will have lasting, eternal significance.  Unfortunately, I don’t remember who exactly said it, but someone once pointed out that there are three things that will last for eternity: God, His Word, and the souls of people.  In as much as we invest our lives in those three things, we have invested our lives in something of eternal significance.

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Here are some thought on upside down orthodoxy or, in other words, the idea that we can be sure of what believe and still be humble about it.

Also, Tim Challies gives suggestions for reading more and better.

Here is a link to another non-Gator who is nevertheless impressed by the outspoken faith of Tim Tebow. Perhaps, there will be one Gator I can tolerate.

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This list comes from the booklet that I am using in discipleship with my sons. It is called Disciplines for Life by John Loftness and C.J. Mahaney. This can be found with more details on the sidebar on page 28. It lists criteria for determining if our prayers are effective. They write that our prayers are effective if:

  • They line up with scriptural truth. John 15:7.
  • They seek results that will glorify God. John 14:13.
  • They are intended to bear good fruit. John 15:16.
  • They spring from a right motive. James 4:3.
  • They are in agreement with the will of God. 1 John 5:14.

They add, “Even if a prayer request meets the
first four criteria, it may not be God’s will.
With time and practice you will gain greater
confidence in discerning the will of God.”

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Tim Challies asks, “Is having so many consumer choices really a good thing?” His answer can be found here.

Timmy Brister makes one more post on the issue of racism.

Tony Snow was the White House Press Secretary. He is an example holding on to faith while in the midst of adversity. Read about it here.

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In the midst of trials and pain, what question should we ask God? Click here to learn more.

Also, here is an article by Sinclair Ferguson on how to handle the sins of others.

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Our waiting for glorification should be eager and at the same time, it should be patient. Eager anticipation with patience is joy in itself that results in increasing the joy of attaining what is anticipated. I must confess that the ideas of the Lord’s return, my glorification and being sinless are not thoughts that cross my mind everyday. I can not say that I eagerly anticipate them.

Could it be that I do not eagerly await that time because I do not hate sin enough? Perhaps this a part of how anticipating future glory should motivate me to godliness. My prayer is that my hatred of sin will increase so that I might long for glory more and thus be driven to godliness.

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Tim Challies gives good warnings against bludgeoning with providence as well as insight into better understanding the will of God.

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